Events

Feed icon 28x28
Download %282%29 original

Video recording and production done by JSConf

JSConf US2013 Schedule

May 29 - 31, 2013

( 39 available presentations )
Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 66 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Oh no! You have a bug in your app, but you have no idea where it is. I’ll walk you through how we found and squashed a gnarly bug in socket.io using wireshark, chrome’s developer tools, lots of logging, and pretty graphs. I’ll also show you some good tips and tricks for tracking down and squashing bugs of your own.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 22 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

In this talk, I will talk about HTML5 JavaScript device APIs that make communication between a browser and hardware possible, and enable mobile web to have "native-like" experiences.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 19 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

An introduction to the Flight framework from Twitter

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 21 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Performance-tuning JavaScript code in a browser environment can feel like a dark art. Let's shine a spotlight on some tricks of the trade: from low-level Chrome tracing to high-speed cameras, and everything in between. We’ll also cover W3C proposals that may lead us to a brighter future -- and discuss when enough optimization is enough.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 20 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Put a TopCoat on PhoneGap
Description: Come check out Adobe's new CSS library for building clean and fast web apps.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 56 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Open your issue trackers, get your pull requests ready, and join John-David Dalton, co-maintainer of jsperf.com and creator of Lo-Dash, to perf the web forward as he discusses commonly overlooked performance issues, rethinks established code patterns, and shares tips you can apply to your own projects and favorite libraries.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 18 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

Once upon a time, there was a roboticist. She spent eight years working with robots of various shapes, sizes, and intelligence levels - her specialty was in planning and navigation algorithms (useful for driverless cars, rescue robots, etc.). Eager for some fresh air away from the lab, she switched gears and started developing a better Internet with JavaScript and Node.js.

In her time away, however, her little robot friends have also learned JavaScript! The likes of Johnny-Five and NodeCopter have breathed new life into those traditionally Python/C++-controlled machines, and our favorite roboticist's little vacation has come to a close.

Whereas 2012 was the start of moving, reactive robots programmed in JavaScript, 2013 will be the year of the smarter, autonomous robot! Task-driven and data-oriented, they will be the most intelligent JS robots you've ever seen - and they'll be the founders of the robot.js of tomorrow.

In this talk, we will discuss and review examples of not only what is possible, but also what traditional roboticists will have a hard time acknowledging: JavaScript is not only a legitimately viable language for robots, but also a fascinating opportunity to solve problems that can't be solved with Python/C++ alone!

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 10 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

Recompilation of running JS without having to restart it. It's like Bret Victors talk, when he demo's rewriting code (http://vimeo.com/36579366 , for example at 5:45). I'd like to show a working proof of concept of this as well as demo other parts of his talk that are up'n'running, and how you'd go about coding something like that.

So a crazy nerdcore JS rewriting and tooling talk. Guaranteed to blow peoples minds.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 9 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

Earlier this year, I sat down with 25,000 lines of code written by a team of variously experienced developers in the crucible of a non-negotiable deadline. I didn't have a list of features to add or a list of bugs to fix; my mandate, as more and more developers were trying and struggling to contribute to the project, was to focus on developer happiness. From simple improvements like adding asserts and logging, to major changes that touched a scary-large portion of the repo, this talk will take a look at what we did to make a large codebase easier to understand, what we still need to do, and what you should start doing on your own project as soon as you get back to work.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 19 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

You have seen how cool it is to wirelessly control flying robots using Node.js, now come see how we can extend the Node Copters with the power of the cloud! Come see how we can use Node.js and Windows Azure to remotely control our robots from hundreds of miles away. See how we can instantly upload our Node Copter camera videos to the cloud and more. This session promises to be ridiculous and fun. Why would we do this you might ask? Because we can.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 16 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

In the early days of the web, a browser could only interact with a server on page load. The XMLHttpRequest enabled the web 2.0 revolution popularizing RESTful web services in the process. Now, with HTML5, we have WebSockets. WebSockets enable a plethora of messaging based communication patterns. This talk will dive into two cujoJS libraries that specialize in client-server communication: rest.js (https://github.com/cujojs/rest) for consuming RESTful HTTP services and msgs.js (https://github.com/cujojs/msgs) for message oriented programing between clients and servers utilizing WebSockets. We’ll talk about what access patterns each of these mediums enable and how to extend these libraries to fit your specific needs.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 16 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 20 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Ingredients:

1x nodejs application, the bigger the better
A handful of external services, AWS will do
Some Cachaça or good Pálinka
Preparation:
With a sharp eye slice open your server and remove its guts, put that aside ...

Keyword soup: microframework for distributed nodejs applications with service discovery and remote dependency control.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 16 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

It is time that news stories told with JavaScript get recognized as a form of journalism. It took years for photo journalism to get the recognition it deserves, now it the time to recognize JS Journalism.

Most news organizations presented election news using JavaScript. News home pages often have more JS than text.

A bit of history. A bit of academia. A bit of current news. A few guesses about the future. But nothing about the future of newspapers.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 12 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

I will cover basics on how the Kinect works, some comparable hardware and how it differs, and finally a few solutions to get the Kinect working with your Javascript/HTML based webpage along with working examples of skeleton tracking, gestures for your application, and more.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 25 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 17 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

A internal civil war has been my life for years as I've walked the razor wire separating breakers and builders.

I'd like to share my experiences presenting outside the security industry at developer conferences like Djangocon, JSConf (trackb), and RealtimeConf what it's like to be the lone security professional in a sea of builders, what it feels like, what they say, what they really care about, how not to speak to them, how to completely disrespect them, and how to fail miserably.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 17 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

http://lab.dev.concord.org/
Two years ago the Google Foundation awarded us a major grant to develop a JavaScript + HTML5 version of our educational physics simulation called Molecular Workbench

Because Javascript is fast and the web is ubiquitous, we have extended the work to create a general framework for publishing explorable scientific simulations that run in the browser,

From the beginning we've kept a close eye on performance and extensibility.

We'll show off our framework and talk about the lessons we've learned regarding this relatively new form of web app.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 37 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

When asked if I wanted to build a Chrome Experiment: a thing that shows off some of the new technology coming to browsers - of course I said yes! Then promptly I bit off the biggest bite of tech I could get my hands on: WebRTC, two way video, peer connection API, orientation events, CSS3 animations, Three.js: generally a lot of tech I didn't really understand!

This talk is about the experience of working with WebRTC for video & data streaming and creating a game with embedded video. How some of the problems I encountered blew my schedule to pieces and perhaps how I could have done things differently.

Spoiler: WebRTC may actually be more of a mindf**k than AppCache.

Rating: Everyone
Viewed 7 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Oh no! You have a bug in your app, but you have no idea where it is. I’ll walk you through how we found and squashed a gnarly bug in socket.io using wireshark, chrome’s developer tools, lots of logging, and pretty graphs. I’ll also show you some good tips and tricks for tracking down and squashing bugs of your own.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 6 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

YayQuery was voted in as a speaker through our alumni callback process, they are currrently finalizing their talk/show description. Stay tuned or check out their previous episodes!

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 12 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Seb is known for his engaging presentations and this will be no exception. He'll be showing how recent developments in browser technology have opened up a wide range of new creative possibilities. Expect demos, live coding, and amusing technical failures.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 0 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Performance-tuning JavaScript code in a browser environment can feel like a dark art. Let's shine a spotlight on some tricks of the trade: from low-level Chrome tracing to high-speed cameras, and everything in between. We’ll also cover W3C proposals that may lead us to a brighter future -- and discuss when enough optimization is enough.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 16 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Making humankind better at programming is one of the big ideas, the big problems to solve. Coding is the new literacy and a terrifying number of people in both developed and underdeveloped countries do not know how to program. Worse, enrollment in CS and Engineering programs is dropping, so it seems as if interest itself is waning. What can we do to fix this?

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 15 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

Can style guides lead to better UI code? Better performance? Yes, absolutely. In this talk, Nicole will show you how she and her team collaborated with Trulia engineers and designers to create a living style guide. She'll also share some yummy data about how that affected real user measurements.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 4 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Browsers have become toy boxes full of fun things to play with. Some of the most fun had is when using HTML5 APIs to enable new forms of interaction between input hardware and the browser for games and other types of dynamic applications.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 9 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

We, The Old Ones, once ventured to the land of HTML5 Audio, discarding the warning "Here Be Dragons". We thought we could tame them. We thought it would be easy. We were wrong.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 4 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

Godwin's Law for JavaScript: as people discuss a proposed extension to JavaScript syntax, the likelihood of someone saying "Stop trying to turn JavaScript into Java!" approaches 1.

For years I've tried to understand this perspective. Why are there so many people out there for whom present-day JavaScript is Good Enough™? What crucial aspect of JavaScript's identity are they trying to defend? Why do they get so scared when someone suggests new syntax? Can we figure out how to evolve the language without incurring the wrath of their pitchforks and/or torches?

I'm going to spend half an hour trying to figure it out, and I invite you to join me.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 5 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

or: "The underpinnings of a modern day web Application". A quick, fun (and educational) look back over nearly a decade of Javascript evolution. Where we are now, where we started, and the mess of nonsense that happened in between.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 9 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 9 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Programming is cool. Developing new features is awesome. Making them work is… boring. In this talk we'll show you how a (software) Robot can make your life more fun by helping debug your code.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 10 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

One of the best-slash-worst-slash-best-again things about JavaScript is its ubiquity on both sides of the client/server model. In this talk, Jed will talk about the useful biomimicry seen on each side of the web ecosystem: in client-side servers like Browserver and Chrome TCP Listen, and server-side clients like JSDOM and PhantomJS.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 8 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

The modern graphics card is a massive parallel computer, capable of pushing dozens of gigabytes of data per second through its pipes. And now with WebGL, you have the keys. To wield that power properly, you need math and lots of it. In this talk we'll explore what makes modern 3D graphics tick, how realistic shader effects are made, and how I learnt to stop worrying and love linear algebra.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 13 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

I am not an expert developer. I am also not a beginning developer.

I'm an intermediate developer, and I want to navigate the path from being a mediocre or good developer, to becoming a great or expert level developer.

How in the heck do I do this?

The tutorial ecosystem of the web is heavily skewed towards beginners, but what about the rest of us?

If you identify with these statements in the slightest, then this talk is for you. With ideas from cognitive science, education, and some advice from admired programmers along the way, we are going to explore what it means to be a world-class developer and what we need to do to get there. I'll talk a little bit about the philosophy, attitude, and habits (both good and bad) required for learning how to learn better, and then we will talk about the kinds of skills and knowledge that an expert programmer in general needs. Along the way we'll touch about various myths and cognitive biases about who can and cannot be a great programmer, and leave you with a path to get started. By the end of the talk, I will have proposed a curriculum of topics that should take an intermediate developer and turn them into an advanced one, and special attention will be given to mastery of the JavaScript language.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 2 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

JavaScript has a yin and yang, or put another world-religion way, it serves two masters: humans who hand-code apps and libraries, and compilers that generate JS as virtual machine code. No language can serve two such masters for long. Consider C, still hand-coded, used only as a target language "temporarily", a la early C++'s cfront. Which one will win with JS? I think hand-coding is closer to God, make no mistake, but I'm concerned about the case that mammon will prevail in the longer run.

In this dystopia, hand-coding will die hard, but compilers can out-generate humans and relieve programmers from having to learn and use JS, especially when they know and prefer another language, and definitely (as in the case of 3D games) when they have C++ code to port. Just as in the story of John Henry vs. the Steam-Powered Hammer, a noble human may get ahead in a sprint, but end up dying after the finish line from a burst heart.

I will present demos of compiled-to-JS programs including 3D games. I'll then do quick dive into the asm.js (http://asmjs.org/) subset of JS generated by Emscripten, and the OdinMonkey all-at-once asm.js compiler built into Firefox's SpiderMonkey engine. I will also present near-term extensions for data and task parallelism in JS. Finally, I will discuss code size and memory use, and sketch how hand-coded and compiler-generated JS can be linked together and share references into one anothers' heaps.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 7 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Everyone knows the apocalypse is coming, but it's not what you think. It's not zombies or prophesied Mayan destruction. No, my friends, it's the offline apocalypse and it is already here! Billions of devices have already been affected and many more will be affected each and every day! Fortunately, HTML5 provides us with weapons like Application Cache, IndexedDB and the FileSystem API to survive the offline apocalypse and have fun doing so. By walking through the building of an "offline first" JS application that is currently deployed across Africa, you will learn how to use these technologies to build robust offline solutions.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 3 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 2, 2015

Anyone who thinks Brendan Eich invented JavaScript has probably never read Oscar Wilde. “The truth is rarely pure and never simple” says Algernon in Wilde's Importance of Being Earnest, thus betraying a wary familairity with our favorite language. It turns out JavaScript's highly expressive nature and the infinite posibilities of its syntax made it a favored medium for our literary forebears.

Last summer I introduced the concept of Literary JavaScript with If Hemingway wrote JavaScript, wherein five famous writers demonstrated their JavaScript smarts. That article generated very positive reactions from both the JavaScript and Literary communities (including write-ups in the New Yorker, Huffington Post and Wired Magazine) and this talk will build on those themes, drawing parallels between the myriad stylistic facets of JavaScript and the kaleidescope of literary genres. There is a serious aspect - I hope to demonstrate that JavaScript's loose structure and lack of boilerplate encourages creativity and is something to celebrate rather than something to WTF about.

Oh, and as an added bonus I'll be unveiling an additional set of recently re-discovered works of literary JavaScript genius.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 2 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Digital Signals Processing (DSP) is inherently essential to any signals-based field, be it digital audio effects, computer graphics, or computer vision. The web has just begun it's foray into accommodating for DSP, becoming increasingly equipped to handle and modulate signals with the advent of technologies such as the Web Audio API and WebGL. With the basic DSP tools provided by these technologies, we are minimally bootstrapped and able to leverage these tools to implement powerful algorithms and incorporate powerful fields of research. One such application is the modulation and processing of music signals. In this talk I will focus on an application that is more complicated than it seems: automatic BPM detection of music. Due to the complexities of how we as humans perceive sound, parse harmonics, and "feel" beats within a song, BPM becomes a challenging and enthralling problem to tackle. I've just begun to embark on an endeavor to implement BPM detection in javascript, building upon budding DSP tools in JS and pulling from algorithms hardened by academic research. I have been digging into academic research papers in the field identifying and categorizing plausible algorithms from simple to complex, separated by effectiveness for differing applications. I hope to implement a number of these algorithms across this spectrum and compare their effectiveness for different kinds of music and applications. I believe exposing and providing robust algorithms for BPM detection would be a strong tool and asset towards many javascript-based web (and server-side ;D) applications, whether for categorization purposes, or for something more dynamic like music visualization.

Capture thumb
Rating: Everyone
Viewed 8 times
Recorded at:
Date Posted: December 3, 2015

Frustration, a rant, a test suite, a gist. Then, community awesomeness. Boom! Promises/A+ was born.

Promise are an old idea for abstracting asynchronous code, but have only recently made their way into JavaScript. We'll look at the power they provide via two striking examples that go beyond the usual "escape from callback hell" snippets. First we'll show how, with ES6 generators, they can act as shallow coroutines to give us back code just as simple as its synchronous counterpart. Then we'll look at how they can be used as proxies for remote objects, across , worker, or web socket boundaries.

However, the most interesting aspect of Promises/A+ is not just the code it enables, but how we worked to create it. We didn't join a standards body, but instead formed a GitHub organization. We had no mailing list, only an issue tracker. We submitted pull requests, made revisions, debated versions tags, etc.—all in the open, on GitHub. And, we succeeded! Promises/A+ is widely used and implemented today, with its extensible core forming the starting point of any discussions about promises. Indeed, this community-produced open standard has recently been informing the incorporation of promises into ECMAScript and the DOM. I'd like to share the story of how this happened, the lessons we learned along the way, and speculate on the role such ad-hoc, community-driven, and completely open specifications have for the future of the web.